Learning 2 stroke maintenance

Elapid

New member
I am a licensed Aircraft A&P mechanic, although I haven't worked on them for 40 years I still consider myself mechanically inclined. I have just started teaching myself the small two cycle engines on my chainsaws and other small gas engine equipment. Hoping to meet some skilled mechanics that can help me with questions I have on the two cycle engines. I have found them to be fascinating powerplants that are very different in operation and look forward to interaction with people that understand these engines. I'm retired and have found myself enjoying working on these small engines that I'm not that familiar with.
 

Elapid

New member
A Poulin chainsaw 2055 it's just the first two cycle engine I have taken down to this level so far. It seems that the piston doesn't bottom out low enough where fuel can get into the cylinder.
 

Bob Hedgecutter

Moderator
Staff member
A Poulin chainsaw 2055 it's just the first two cycle engine I have taken down to this level so far. It seems that the piston doesn't bottom out low enough where fuel can get into the cylinder.

???? Where are you expecting it to "bottom out" to? How do you see the fuel getting into the cylinder?
 

Bob Hedgecutter

Moderator
Staff member
Fuel goes in the crank case then when piston comes down fuel/air mix is pushed up to the cylinder through the transfer ports

Yes, but was trying to get Elapid to explain how it worked, to establish if he had an understanding of how the fuel travels from the tank into the combustion chamber.
This explains it really well-

 

Elapid

New member
I'm looking at the intake port when I rotate the crankshaft to bottom dead center and the piston doesn't go far enough to allow the intake port to open. Thanks for this explanation I was thinking the piston dropped down to have the fuel air mixture go into the cylinder through the intake port from the carburetor. Now I understand how the cylinder gets the fresh air. These small two cycles don't operate anything like what I'm used to, they truly amaze me with their operation,
 

Elapid

New member
I have used chainsaws for quite a few years but would never consider myself an expert, the day I think I'm an expert with a chainsaw is when I will put the saw down for good because I will never be an expert. I stop when my arms get tired at my age I stop for the day not just a rest. I used to think that chainsaw chaps and other protective equipment gave you a false feeling of security and never used them. I'm 68 years old now and have physical limitations I didn't have when I was younger, and I might even be getting a little smarter with some age. After reading some peoples experience with chaps I have decided that it is in fact a smart decision to use them so I ordered a pair along with an industrial Forestry Helmet with hearing protection system. I'm already very hard of hearing after working around aircraft but it came with the helmet and face guard. I decided to go with the equipment because I find myself using my chainsaws more than I ever did when I wasn't this active using them. I came to this forum to learn more about using a chainsaw and specifically learn more about how they work. Anybody that has any wisdom and advice I'm open to listen. Thank you for having me here and aparently I'm already learning a good bit from your experience.
 

Bob Hedgecutter

Moderator
Staff member
No experts here neither- just some generally good natured folk with varying degrees of knowledge.
You would be amazed by the amount of 2 stroke equipment users that never understand how the machine works- that is very common and people perhaps know about valves and above cylinder intake inlets- but have never seen inside a 2 stroke cylinder to understand transfers and how combustible mixture travels from below the piston to above it!
Many realise chains and every now and then bars are expendable items that need replaced now and then, but few of them think of the spur or sprocket that drives the chain from the crank rotation.
Once upon a time- all of us knew nothing and were all in the same boat.
 

MadKaw

New member
I am a licensed Aircraft A&P mechanic, although I haven't worked on them for 40 years I still consider myself mechanically inclined. I have just started teaching myself the small two cycle engines on my chainsaws and other small gas engine equipment. Hoping to meet some skilled mechanics that can help me with questions I have on the two cycle engines. I have found them to be fascinating powerplants that are very different in operation and look forward to interaction with people that understand these engines. I'm retired and have found myself enjoying working on these small engines that I'm not that familiar with.
Too bad you're not up my way, I've got a bunch of engines that you could use to entertain yourself.
 
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